Joe Biden, Democrats underestimated in poll

Trump has endorsed 330 candidates this year, most of whom were in races that could have given them extraordinary power to set election rules and shake up future elections, had they not been defeated.

Among them was Pennsylvania gubernatorial candidate Doug Mastriano, a far-right politician who helped get people to Washington on the day of the Jan. 6 Capitol attack and then tried to help Trump to cancel votes in his state. He was beaten by former attorney general Josh Shapiro last week and only conceded the AEDT on Monday.

Once an Oath Keeper: Mark Finchem, is a Republican candidate for Secretary of State from Arizona.

Once an Oath Keeper: Mark Finchem, is a Republican candidate for Secretary of State from Arizona.Credit:PA

Another extreme candidate was Mark Finchem, a member of the Oath Keepers militia, which is also linked to the US Capitol riots. Finchem was seen as a good chance to become Arizona’s election official, otherwise known as secretary of state, where he planned to ban early voting and restrict mail-in ballots, which were used in Arizona for years.

And in Nevada, which secured the Democrats their majority in the Senate, another important result was also called on Friday, against Republican candidate for Secretary of State Jim Marchant.

Marchant had pushed Nevada’s largest county to switch to manual ballot counting based on Trump-fueled conspiracy theories about the validity of voting machines.

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He also led a national coalition of like-minded conservatives, also running for Secretary of State across the United States, and at a rally in June made his intentions clear: “When my coalition of Candidates for Secretary of State across the country will be elected, we’ll fix the whole country and President Trump will be President again in 2024!

Second, just as the midterm elections were a victory for democracy, they were also a rebuke to the US Supreme Court’s decision to strike down the constitutional right to abortion.

Across the country, voters won a string of pivotal victories for reproductive freedom, from Michigan and Montana, to Vermont and California.

The biggest surprise came from the Republican state of Kentucky, where an anti-abortion amendment was defeated, following in the footsteps of a similar attempt in Kansas to strip protections from the state constitution earlier this year. .

People cheer during a primary watch party in Overland Park, Kansas.  Voters in the state rejected a conservative in-state ballot measure with deep ties to the anti-abortion movement.

People cheer during a primary watch party in Overland Park, Kansas. Voters in the state rejected a conservative in-state ballot measure with deep ties to the anti-abortion movement.Credit:The Kansas City/AP Star

The findings suggest that while Republican states sought to impose tough restrictions on women, much of the public differed, with midterm polls showing about 6 in 10 voters think abortion should be legal in all or in most cases.

In many ways, this issue marks an inflection point in America. Republicans have been running on abortion for years, using it to reliably galvanize their base ahead of the election. Now there’s a chance Democrats will do the same, reminding voters of what some GOP candidates could do — take away their right to choose — if they control the levers.

There was also a third major factor behind the Democrats’ better-than-expected result: young people.

While the 2022 midterm elections did not result in a red or blue wave, there certainly was a Gen Z wave, as young people who have grown old enough to vote over the past decade are presented in force to make their voices heard.

Culinary Union members Edrulfo Camacho and his mother Angelica are knocking on the door in Las Vegas.

Culinary Union members Edrulfo Camacho and his mother Angelica are knocking on the door in Las Vegas.Credit:Farrah Tomazine

On the Nevada battlefield, for example, 21-year-old Edrulfo Camacho — one of many hospitality workers hit hard by the global pandemic — has spent weeks knocking on doors in the suburbs of Las Vegas to register more voters to help push incumbent Senator Catherine Cortez Masto over the line.

In the southern state of Mississippi, where the clinic at the center of the Supreme Court’s decision to overturn Roe V Wade was recently closed, student Victoria Akins has raised fears about what could happen if she accidentally got pregnant but could not access an abortion. services.

“I don’t want to be in college and exploring the student life and then something happens to me where I can’t get an abortion,” the part-time saleswoman said.

And in the sunny state of Florida, Maxwell Frost, 25, last week became the first member of Generation Z elected to serve in the US Congress after campaigning on a platform of gun control, racial justice and universal health care.

According to the Center for Information and Research on Civic Learning and Engagement (CIRCLE), about 27% of young Americans between the ages of 18 and 29 voted in this year’s poll.

While the votes are still being counted, most young people have turned to the Democrats, whose policies include codifying abortion protections into law, canceling student debt, combating gun violence and investing in climate change.

This proved especially crucial in tight contests such as the Senate race for Pennsylvania, where Gen Zers increased their share of the electorate from 2018 and supported John Fetterman, the survivor of a hoodie-wearing, tattoo-covered stroke that beat the Trump-backed celebrity doctor. Mehmed Oz.

It was supposed to be a much easier path for Republicans. After all, history shows that between 1918 and 2016, the president’s party lost an average of 29 House seats and an average of four Senate seats in its first midterm election.

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This year, Biden still had some pushback, but he was much weaker than expected, turning the election into a two-party choice instead of the usual referendum on the incumbent administration.

And faced with this choice – a party in the shadow of Trump; the erosion of reproductive freedom; fewer gains for future generations – Biden ended up defying expectations once again.

“We have lost fewer seats in the House of Representatives than the first Democratic president elected at midterm in at least 40 years,” Biden told his supporters in Washington last week, visibly relieved.

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