Original Wonder Woman actress Lynda Carter defends the DC superhero as a queer icon

Original Wonder Woman actress Lynda Carter defends the DC superhero as a queer icon: ‘If you want to argue that she is somehow not a queer or trans icon, then you’re not paying attention’

Lynda Carter spent the first day of Pride Month defending the iconic superhero Wonder Woman as a queer icon.

Carter, 70, played the DC Comics icon in the beloved TV series of the same name from 1975 to 1979, decades before Gal Gadot portrayed her in recent Warner Bros. movies.

The actress took to Twitter on Wednesday to celebrate Pride, but ended up defending her beloved character as well.

Defending: Lynda Carter spent the first day of Pride Month defending the iconic superhero Wonder Woman as a queer icon

Defending: Lynda Carter spent the first day of Pride Month defending the iconic superhero Wonder Woman as a queer icon

Carter first tweeted artwork of Wonder Woman created by Paulina Ganucheau, which was used as a Pride Month variant cover for Wonder Woman #773, released in June 2021.

‘Happy Pride! So excited to celebrate with all my LGBTQIA+ friends and fans,’ she said with a rainbow emoji and crediting Ganucheau for the artwork.

Unfortunately, her tweet was met by a few hateful remarks, including a woman named Amber Heffner, who tweeted at Carter that, ‘Wonder Woman IS NOT A SUPER HERO FOR GAYS!’

Artwork: Carter first tweeted artwork of Wonder Woman created by Paulina Ganucheau, which was used as a Pride Month variant cover for Wonder Woman #773, released in June 2021

Artwork: Carter first tweeted artwork of Wonder Woman created by Paulina Ganucheau, which was used as a Pride Month variant cover for Wonder Woman #773, released in June 2021

Carter quote-retweeted that tweet, adding, ‘You’re right. She’s a superhero for bisexuals!’

That tweet also linked to a 2016 Polygon article where comic book writer Greg Rucka confirmed that Wonder Woman was bisexual in his new comic Wonder Woman: Year One.

She also responded to a more positive comment from reporter Benjamin Ryan, who said, ‘Wonder Woman is the original lesbian icon,’ with Carter responding, ‘And now she’s a bi icon!’ while linking to a 2016 Hollywood Reporter article about Rucka’s revelation. 

Bisexual: Carter quote-retweeted that tweet, adding, 'You're right. She's a superhero for bisexuals!'

Bisexual: Carter quote-retweeted that tweet, adding, ‘You’re right. She’s a superhero for bisexuals!’

Icon: She also responded to a more positive comment from reporter Benjamin Ryan, who said, 'Wonder Woman is the original lesbian icon,' with Carter responding, 'And now she's a bi icon!' while linking to a 2016 Hollywood Reporter article about Rucka's revelation

Icon: She also responded to a more positive comment from reporter Benjamin Ryan, who said, ‘Wonder Woman is the original lesbian icon,’ with Carter responding, ‘And now she’s a bi icon!’ while linking to a 2016 Hollywood Reporter article about Rucka’s revelation

The actress would later address her thoughts on Wonder Woman being queer in another tweet.

‘I didn’t write Wonder Woman, but if you want to argue that she is somehow not a queer or trans icon, then you’re not paying attention,’ Carter said.

‘Every time someone comes up to me and says that WW helped them while they were closeted, it reminds me how special the role is,’ she concluded.

Queer: The actress would later address her thoughts on Wonder Woman being queer in another tweet

Queer: The actress would later address her thoughts on Wonder Woman being queer in another tweet

Fight: She also shared an image she teased was her 'I'm ready to fight your homophobic relatives pose'

Fight: She also shared an image she teased was her ‘I’m ready to fight your homophobic relatives pose’

Wonder Woman’s very origins have roots within the LGBTQ+ community.

Wonder Woman was created in 1941 by William Moulton Marston, who was inspired by his wife Elizabeth and their polyamorous partner Olivia Byrne to create the iconic hero.

Marston passed away in 1947 at just 53 years of age, though Elizabeth and Olive continued to live together for decades after his passing.

Their story was told in the 2017 film Professor Marston and the Wonder Women, starring Luke Evans as Marston, Rebecca Hall as his wife Elizabeth and Bella Heathcote as Olivia. 

Origins: The actress would later address her thoughts on Wonder Woman being queer in another tweet

Origins: The actress would later address her thoughts on Wonder Woman being queer in another tweet

Creator: Wonder Woman was created in 1941 by William Moulton Marston, who was inspired by his wife Elizabeth and their polyamorous partner Olivia Byrne to create the iconic hero

Creator: Wonder Woman was created in 1941 by William Moulton Marston, who was inspired by his wife Elizabeth and their polyamorous partner Olivia Byrne to create the iconic hero

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